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Hacking Jenkins Servers With No Password

Hacking Jenkins Servers With No Password

Here’s a fun Jenkins trick I have been using on some recent Information Security Assessments to gain an initial foothold. If you aren’t familiar with hacking Jenkins servers, it runs by default on port 8080 and also by default it has no password (Hurray!). According to their Wiki: “Jenkins is an award-winning application that monitors executions of repeated jobs, such as building a software project or jobs run by cron.” Here is what Jenkins looks like.Read More


Pwn all the Sauce with Caller ID Spoofing

Pwn all the Sauce with Caller ID Spoofing

If we’re going to perform some pre-text phone calls we have a couple different options when it comes to the caller ID. We really only have 3 possible options which are: we do nothing to the phone number, we block our phone number, or we spoof our phone number.

Doing nothing to the caller ID will sometimes work depending on the area code you call from versus the area code that your client is located in. In my experiences, sometimes not blocking the number yields better results than blocking the number. I always feel like users are more suspicious when the caller ID says ‘blocked’or ‘unavailable’. Not only are they on heightened awareness, but I feel like they are less likely to even answer the phone thinking it’s most likely a telemarketer.

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Track User Clicks when Email Phishing

Track User Clicks when Email Phishing

When performing email phishing engagements my clients often ask or want to know what users actually clicked on the phishing email. There are many ways to accomplish this task, but I’m going to discuss the method I use to track each unique visitor to my phishing website.

I prefaced this article in one of my previous blog posts “How do I phish” where I discuss using a ruby script I call sendmail.rb. There is nothing special or magical about the script, it just offers an alternative way to send phishing emails that will assist in tracking each unique visit to your phishing website. There is also value in knowing the CIO or some other C-level executive was just phished.

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Scheduled tasks with S4U and on demand persistence

Scheduled tasks with S4U and on demand persistence

Github module [1, 2]

I came across an interesting article by scriptjunkie (which you should really read) about running code on a machine at any time using service-for-user. By changing one line in the export XML of a scheduled task you effectively get a scheduled task that can run whether or not a user is logged in, whether or not the system reboots, whether or not you have the user’s password, run as a limited user, and doesn’t require bypassing UAC! This isn’t an interactive logon but can still be very useful in certain situations.

This works with any user with logon as batch job. While scriptjunkies blog post only showed altering a basic task scheduled to run every hour, it is possible to create more complex triggers based off a variety of things to make a more flexible trigger for your payload. Some of the triggers can even be used to replicate functionality for non-privileged accounts that are usually restricted. Some can even be used to trigger a scheduled task remotely from only your IP address.

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How do I phish? – Advanced Email Phishing Tactics

How do I phish? - Advanced Email Phishing Tactics

I’m often times asked how I perform email email phishing attacks.  Email phishing attacks are very compelling, and unique to each situation. The process of creating a successful email phishing campaign is very methodical, and most of the time and effort goes up front into the planning phase.

Understanding that good security is a multilayer approach and we will have many layers of security that could potentially destroy our email phishing campaign. Some of these layers may include Email Gateway Spam Filters, Outlook ‘Junk Email’ Filters, Host based Antivirus, Intrusion Prevention Systems, Web Proxy Servers, Egress filtering, and the list goes on and on.

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Hard coded encryption keys and more WordPress fun

Hard coded encryption keys and more WordPress fun

Metasploit modules [1, 2]

A few days ago I was chatting with pasv about a recent vulnerability he discovered. Apparently there was demand for Razer Synapse which syncs the configuration for a Razer mouse to the “cloud”. Syncing configurations to the cloud was most likely needed since some of Razer models have so many buttons the mouse has its own full blown number pad on the side. Pasv got bored and did what any good bored security professional does and reverse engineered the Razer Synapse installer. He discovered that the encryption key and IV were hard coded for the “Remember my password” feature (PoC).

The vulnerability was recently fixed before the new year (12/27/12), via an auto-update in the Razer Synapse software but we figure there are probably at least a few configuration files still sitting out there. This vulnerability was very similar to a recent metasploit module @zeknox and I released about Spark IM so it was fairly painless to write up a new module to exploit this configuration.

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WordPress Pingback Portscanner – Metasploit Module

Metasploit Module Wordpress Pingback Port Scanner

The latest version of WordPress, version 3.5 was recently released on December 11, 2012. This latest version of WordPress comes pre-packaged with the XML-RPC interface enabled by default. This is just the type of configuration that us pentesters love to see during an engagment. This additional attack surface may be just the little extra that a pentester needs.

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Recover Spark IM Stored Passwords with Metasploit

Recover Spark IM Stored Passwords with Metasploit

Metasploit Module [1]

I recently added a post exploit module to the metasploit framework. The module will extract and decrypt passwords that are stored by the Spark Instant Messenger client. The passwords are stored in a file on the local HDD (spark.properties) using Triple DES encryption. This sounds all fine and dandy, but this all goes out the door when they hardcoded the key and made it publicly documented.

The vulnerability isn’t that new since it was documented by Adam Caudill back in July 2012 when he disclosed the details and PoC code in .net that illustrates how the attack can be completed.  Mubix recently submitted a  request to add this post exploit module into the framework. Well, SmilingRacoon and myself decided to answer the call and work up a module to accomplish this task.

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Using Metasm To Avoid Antivirus Detection (Ghost Writing ASM)

Using Metasm To Avoid Antivirus Detection (Ghost Writing ASM)

Preface

It seems that more and more these days I find myself battling head to head against my client’s Antivirus Detection capabilities. Payloads I encoded to successfully bypass one solution get picked up by another. An executable that walked effortlessly past one AV this week gets stopped dead in its tracks by the very same software build at a different client the week later. This is a frustrating and constant problem for myself and many other Penetration Testers I am sure.

The topic of Antivirus Detection bypass is not a new one by any means. Currently there exist several methodologies that work well and I don’t think anyone (at least no one I know) can respectfully make a claim for a particular method being the De facto standard that works every time.

This article aims to provide some insight into one such method that I have become fond of and has proven quite successful in many of my recent Information Security Assessments. I first became aware of the technique by reading This Great Writeup from exploit-db. I’m not sure if the author is responsible for coining the term or not but they refer to this ancient wisdom and all of its magical powers under the alias “Ghost Writing” which I think sounds super cool!
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